Breaking down bullying some anthropological perspectives

In this paper, we discuss how we are extending the Preschool in Three Cultures studies in a new direction. We present summaries of three recently published studies:

Breaking down bullying some anthropological perspectives

Views of social problems Functionalism Social stability is necessary for a strong society, and adequate socialization and social integration are necessary for social stability.

Slow social change is desirable, but rapid social change threatens social order. Solutions to social problems should take the form of gradual social reform rather than sudden and far-reaching change. Despite their negative effects, social problems often also serve important functions for society.

Conflict theory Society is characterized by pervasive inequality based on social class, race, gender, and other factors. Far-reaching social change is needed to reduce or eliminate social inequality and to create an egalitarian society.

Social problems arise from fundamental faults in the structure of a society and both reflect and reinforce inequalities based on social class, race, gender, and other dimensions. Successful solutions to social problems must involve far-reaching change in the structure of society. Symbolic interactionism People construct their roles as they interact; they do not merely learn the roles that society has set out for them.

As this interaction occurs, individuals negotiate their definitions of the situations in which they find themselves and socially construct the reality of these situations. In so doing, they rely heavily on Breaking down bullying some anthropological perspectives such as words and gestures to reach a shared understanding of their interaction.

Social problems arise from the interaction of individuals.

SparkLife » Bullies: An Anthropological Survey

People who engage in socially problematic behaviors often learn these behaviors from other people. Individuals also learn their perceptions of social problems from other people.

Functionalism Functionalism The view that social institutions are important for their contributions to social stability. The first was the French Revolution ofwhose intense violence and bloody terror shook Europe to its core. The aristocracy throughout Europe feared that revolution would spread to their own lands, and intellectuals feared that social order was crumbling.

The Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century reinforced these concerns. Starting first in Europe and then in the United States, the Industrial Revolution led to many changes, including the rise and growth of cities as people left their farms to live near factories.

As the cities grew, people lived in increasingly poor, crowded, and decrepit conditions, and crime was rampant. Here was additional evidence, if European intellectuals needed it, of the breakdown of social order.

In response, the intellectuals began to write that a strong society, as exemplified by strong social bonds and rules and effective socialization, was needed to prevent social order from disintegrating. Without a strong society and effective socialization, they warned, social order breaks down, and violence and other signs of social disorder result.

Original work published It does so, he wrote, through two related social mechanisms: It uses the human body as a model for understanding society.

Breaking down bullying some anthropological perspectives

In the human body, our various organs and other body parts serve important functions for the ongoing health and stability of our body.

Our eyes help us see, our ears help us hear, our heart circulates our blood, and so forth. Just as we can understand the body by describing and understanding the functions that its parts serve for its health and stability, so can we understand society by describing and understanding the functions that its parts—or, more accurately, its social institutions—serve for the ongoing health and stability of society.

Thus functionalism emphasizes the importance of social institutions such as the family, religion, and education for producing a stable society. Similar to the view of the conservative intellectuals from which it grew, functionalism is skeptical of rapid social change and other major social upheaval.

The analogy to the human body helps us understand this skepticism. In our bodies, any sudden, rapid change is a sign of danger to our health. If we break a bone in one of our legs, we have trouble walking; if we lose sight in both our eyes, we can no longer see.

Breaking down bullying some anthropological perspectives

Slow changes, such as the growth of our hair and our nails, are fine and even normal, but sudden changes like those just described are obviously troublesome. By analogy, sudden and rapid changes in society and its social institutions are troublesome according to the functionalist perspective.

If the human body evolved to its present form and functions because these made sense from an evolutionary perspective, so did society evolve to its present form and functions because these made sense.

Any sudden change in society thus threatens its stability and future. Accordingly, gradual social reform should be all that is needed to address the social problem.

The Sociological Imagination

Functionalism even suggests that social problems must be functional in some ways for society, because otherwise these problems would not continue.

This is certainly a controversial suggestion, but it is true that many social problems do serve important functions for our society. For example, crime is a major social problem, but it is also good for the economy because it creates hundreds of thousands of jobs in law enforcement, courts and corrections, home security, and other sectors of the economy whose major role is to deal with crime.

If crime disappeared, many people would be out of work! Similarly, poverty is also a major social problem, but one function that poverty serves is that poor people do jobs that otherwise might not get done because other people would not want to do them Gans, The positive functions of poverty.Feb 04,  · On TV and in movies, bullies are often depicted in the same way: as big, muscle-bound goons with limited vocabularies who push around people much smaller than themselves.

While these archetypal thugs certainly exist, bullies, like us non-bully types, come in all shapes and sizes, and use a variety of tactics. Some studies suggest that approximately one out of every seven children in the United States has either been bullied or has initiated bullying upon other students (Olweus, ).

This is a significantly higher number of students than in schools in UK, Europe, and Scandinavian countries that have focused more attention on the problem of bullying. Some studies suggest that approximately one out of every seven children in the United States has either been bullied or has initiated bullying upon other students (Olweus, ).

This is a significantly higher number of students than in schools in UK, Europe, and Scandinavian countries that have focused more attention on the problem of bullying.

an anthropological perspective, which relies on participant observation rehabilitation and to break down institutionalism. They are modelled on various ideas of care, but use notions of kinship for a guiding philosophy. and some new choices in their lifestyles and activities.

However, their. This chapter will entail a review of theoretical frameworks that are typically utilized to understand and address bullying, including an ecological systems framework, social learning, cognitive behavioural, attribution, lifestyles exposure and resilience frameworks.

Combo with "Anthro Practice Midterm" and 9 others. STUDY. PLAY. Ethnography is. A. the firsthand, personal study of local settings.

the application of anthropological data, perspectives, theory, and methods to identify, assess, and solve contemporary social problems identities, contrast, and standards are reaching out and breaking down.

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